Evidence-informed Health Policy: a series from Implementation Science

Here is a new series from Implementation Science, a BioMed Central journal (Open Access):

John N Lavis, Andrew D Oxman, Ray Moynihan, Elizabeth J Paulsen. Evidence-informed health policy 1 – Synthesis of findings from a multi-method study of organizations that support the use of research evidence. Implementation Science 2008, 3:53 (17 December 2008)
Conclusions: This synthesis of findings from a multi-method study, along with the more detailed findings from each of the three phases of the study (which are reported in the three following articles in the series), provide a strong basis on which researchers, policymakers, international organizations (and networks) like WHO can respond to the growing chorus of voices calling for efforts to support the use of research evidence in developing health policy.

John N Lavis, Elizabeth J Paulsen, Andrew D Oxman, Ray Moynihan. Evidence-informed health policy 2 – Survey of organizations that support the use of research evidence. Implementation Science 2008, 3:54 (17 December 2008)
Conclusions: The findings from our survey, the most broadly based of its kind, both extend or clarify the applicability of the messages arising from previous surveys and related documentary analyses, such as how the ‘principles of evidence-based medicine dominate current guideline programs’ and the importance of collaborating with other organizations. The survey also provides a description of the history, structure, processes, outputs, and perceived strengths and weaknesses of existing organizations from which those establishing or leading similar organizations can draw.

John N Lavis, Andrew D Oxman, Ray Moynihan, Elizabeth J Paulsen. Evidence-informed health policy 3 – Interviews with the directors of organizations that support the use of research evidence. Implementation Science 2008, 3:55 (17 December 2008)
Conclusions: The findings from our interview study, the most broadly based of its kind, extend to both CPG-producing organizations and GSUs the applicability of the messages arising from previous interview studies of HTA agencies, such as to collaborate with other organizations and to be attentive to implementation considerations. Our interview study also provides a rich description of organizations supporting the use of research evidence, which can be drawn upon by those establishing or leading similar organizations in LMICs.

John N Lavis, Ray Moynihan, Andrew D Oxman, Elizabeth J Paulsen. Evidence-informed health policy 4 – Case descriptions of organizations that support the use of research evidence. Implementation Science 2008, 3:56 (17 December 2008)
Conclusions: The findings from our case descriptions, the first of their kind, intersect in interesting ways with the messages arising from two systematic reviews of the factors that increase the prospects for research use in policymaking. Strong relationships between researchers and policymakers bodes well given such interactions appear to increase the prospects for research use. The time-consuming nature of an evidence-based approach, on the other hand, suggests the need for more efficient production processes that are ‘quick and clean enough.’ Our case descriptions and accompanying video documentaries provide a rich description of organizations supporting the use of research evidence, which can be drawn upon by those establishing or leading similar organizations, particularly in low- and middle-income countries.

See also:
Jane L Hutton, Martin P Eccles, Jeremy M Grimshaw. Ethical issues in implementation research: a discussion of the problems in achieving informed consent. Implementation Science 2008, 3:52 (17 December 2008).


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