Cochrane reviews compared with industry supported meta-analyses and other meta-analyses of the same drugs: systematic review

bmjlogo.gif  Here is an interesting review published recently in the BMJ:

Jorgensen AW, Hilden J, Gotzsche PC. Cochrane reviews compared with industry supported meta-analyses and other meta-analyses of the same drugs: systematic review. BMJ 2006; 333(7572):782-786.

OBJECTIVE: To compare the methodological quality and conclusions in Cochrane reviews with those in industry supported meta-analyses and other meta-analyses of the same drugs.
DESIGN: Systematic review comparing pairs of meta-analyses that studied the same two drugs in the same disease and were published within two years of each other.
DATA SOURCES: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (2003, issue 1), PubMed, and Embase.
DATA EXTRACTION: Two observers independently extracted data and used a validated scale to judge the methodological quality of the reviews.
RESULTS: 175 of 1596 Cochrane reviews had a meta-analysis that compared two drugs. Twenty four meta-analyses that matched the Cochrane reviews were found: eight were industry supported, nine had undeclared support, and seven had no support or were supported by non-industry sources. On a 0-7 scale, the median quality score was 7 for Cochrane reviews and 3 for other reviews (P < 0.01). Compared with industry supported reviews and reviews with undeclared support, Cochrane reviews had more often considered the potential for bias in the review–for example, by describing the method of concealment of allocation and describing excluded patients or studies. The seven industry supported reviews that had conclusions recommended the experimental drug without reservations, compared with none of the Cochrane reviews (P = 0.02), although the estimated treatment effect was similar on average (z = 0.46, P = 0.64). Reviews with undeclared support and reviews with not for profit support or no support had conclusions that were similar in cautiousness to the Cochrane reviews.
CONCLUSIONS: Industry supported reviews of drugs should be read with caution as they were less transparent, had few reservations about methodological limitations of the included trials, and had more favourable conclusions than the corresponding Cochrane reviews.
PubMed Record      Free full text 

Riding the Waves of “Web 2.0″

pew.gif  This new report about what’s evolving on the Internet was released earlier this month by PEW/Internet and American Life Project. From the site:

“Web 2.0” has become a catch-all buzzword that people use to describe a wide range of online activities and applications, some of which the Pew Internet & American Life Project has been tracking for years. As researchers, we instinctively reach for our spreadsheets to see if there is evidence to inform the hype about any online trend. This article provides a short history of the phrase, along with new traffic data from Hitwise to help frame the discussion.

Link to these other Internet Evolution resources:
The Future of the Internet II;  Internet Penetration and Impact;  Tech Term Awareness;  How the Internet has woven itself into American life;  The Future of the Internet

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